The Importance of Early Education for All

It’s time for reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. There’s no doubt change is necessary to ensure our children’s civil rights to a high quality education. While the media has focused on the annual assessments mandated by NCLB as being key, I want to highlight another critical improvement needed: high-quality preschool.

We are a family that can speak to the benefits of high-quality preschool for every child. We have lived in the north, south, east, and west. Our whole lives have been about education and overcoming struggle and “the odds.”

LaToyaSmithFamily

(Photo courtesy LaToya Smith.)

I am an African American born to teenage parents thirty years ago in Michigan. Yet, now that I have my own children, I understand how fortunate I was to attend a Montessori program at age three and then preschool at my public elementary school at age four. Since then, excelling in school has been second nature to me. I was high school valedictorian and magna cum laude at a top major university.

I was nearly finished with college in Los Angeles when I got married and my husband and I started our family. I wanted my children to have high-quality preschool like I did, but it came at a steep price. We found the same to be true from California to Mississippi — North Carolina and Michigan.

Three years ago we moved to Washington, D.C., where our three-year-old son could go to school with our five-year-old daughter each day. We were so relieved. He was excelling in many ways — cognitively, socially, and emotionally.

I could see the results of his early learning at home. He was more conversational. He spoke to us about his friends at school. He has learned the alphabet, to count, the names of basic shapes and colors, and so much more. He talked about the stars and the galaxy, and D.C. as the nation’s capital. He knew of President Obama, the names of the First family, including their pets, and even their address — “1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW!” He asked about visiting the White House.

He was excited about learning!

Having my son enrolled in high quality preschool definitely prepared him for kindergarten. I believe he will have a strong start like I did, a life-long thirst for learning, and achieve anything he wants. Regardless of what type of money a child’s parents make, their cultural background, their native language, where they live, as Americans, they should have access to the same high quality education early in life. Why? Because we know it’s what’s best for them, their future, their family’s future, and thus the future of our country. It would be a disservice not to include preschool in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Latoya Smith is the Founder and President of Pros4Kids and Chair of the DCPS Early Childhood Education Policy Council.

2 Comments

  1. I feel that our education systems needs to teach kids about real life money. And how to budget and start a business. I feel that any child that learns these basic skills and applies them to the mobile food industry they can be a success. I suggest checking out FoodTruckResource.com to get started

  2. I know about the importance of education because I came from another country where education was not a priority. I always wanted to attend high school but my parents couldn’t afford the expenses such as: shelter, food, tuition, books and clothes. I was lucky that I had the chance to go to school from kindergarten to middle school; high school or even college was a far away dream. Now, I am a mother of four smart girls and I was sure they all could attend the university. Parents are also very important in the education of their children. It is necessary to involve them as much as possible. It doesn’t matter how well the school is doing, but if parents are not involved in the education of their children the school will have some difficulties achieving the goals. Currently I had the opportunity to go college. First, I went for my GED and then I attended the university. Right now I have tree year of college and I hope soon I will get my bachelor degree in Elementary Education. Getting my education has been a little bit difficult because while I was studying the subject, I also was learning the language. I wish I can motivate other adults to do the same I did, but most importantly I want to motivate children to do their best in school and of this go far in life, such as my smart girls.

Comments are closed.