A Renewed U.S. Commitment to International Education

Guest blog by Maureen McLaughlin, Senior Advisor and Director of International Affairs, Office of the Secretary

a renewed U.S. commitment to international education

If it wasn’t already clear before the pandemic, it should be clear now that, in today’s interconnected world, many of our biggest challengesreducing economic and social disparities, building prosperity, supporting public health, addressing climate change, and maintaining peaceare global in nature. To address these challenges, we must work togethernot just within the United States, but also with others around the world.

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Next Steps in OCR’s Comprehensive Review of Title IX Actions: A New Q&A and the Public Hearing Transcript

Title IX next steps: A new Q&A and the public hearing transcript

The following is a cross-post from the Office for Civil Rights.

As the Office for Civil Rights continues our comprehensive review of the U.S. Department of Education’s actions under Title IX, the landmark law that prohibits discrimination based on sex in our nation’s schools, we are pleased to share several recent steps—including two taken today.  

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Students, Immigration Status, and the Right to Public Education

Students, immigration status, and the right to public education

The following is a cross-post from the Office for Civil Rights.

An essential part of ensuring equal opportunity is protecting all students in their access to education free from discrimination. This includes the right of all students in the United States to attend America’s public elementary and secondary schools, regardless of their immigration or citizenship status.

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The Next Decade of Climate Leadership at the U.S. Department of Education: An Exchange of Ideas to Inform the Agency’s Climate Adaptation Plan

On January 27, 2021, the Biden Administration issued Executive Order (E.O.) 14008, Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad.The order revitalizes past Federal efforts to enhance adaptation and bolster resilience by requiring each Federal agency to devise a Climate Adaptation Plan. The plans are a first step in leveraging Federal agencies to demonstrate climate leadership through both policy and example.

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Standing with Native Communities during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Advancing its commitment to equity, meaningful consultation, and relief for Tribal Nations, the U.S. Department of Education has announced approximately $20 million in grants available to Tribal Educational Agencies (TEAs) through the American Rescue Plan (ARP) to meet the urgent needs of students in response to the coronavirus pandemic. The American Indian Resilience in Education (AIRE) grant program will fund culturally relevant projects designed to assist and encourage Indian children and youth to enter, remain in, or reenter school at any grade level from Pre-K through grade 12. This grant program is a one-time discretionary grant competition to make sure students from across our country have the resources needed to be successful and can come out of the COVID-19 pandemic stronger than ever.

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A Summer to Remember

Guest blog by Christian Rhodes

My first “real” job was as a camp counselor at the local Boys and Girls Club in Cabarrus County, North Carolina. I spent the summer ensuring middle school students had fun while learning. I would stay up late thinking of new lessons to teach or a motivating message I would recite during our morning check-ins. I appreciated each high five, smile, and even a few tears as camp concluded as I got ready for my next semester at UNC-Chapel Hill. Occasionally, I would see my “students” when I visited home at the grocery store or church. I was always surprised that they remembered our special handshakes, mostly because I had forgotten them. I loved being a camp counselor. I loved the young people I met and hopefully positively influenced.

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Title VI at 57: Commemorating the Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Title VI at 57: commemorating the civil rights act of 1964

Today marks the fifty-seventh anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a landmark law passed at the height of the modern civil rights movement and in the midst of entrenched racial discrimination and massive resistance to desegregation. The law came a century after our country fought a war to end slavery, whose vestiges were then codified by Jim Crow and conserved by the de jure protection of separate but unequal spaces. Put simply, the Civil Rights Act’s passage in 1964 was not an end to the struggle, it was a new beginning.

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FCC Announces the $7.17 Billion Emergency Connectivity Fund to Help Schools Close the Homework Gap

As our students return to school buildings and we move from pandemic response to recovery, technology will be essential for meeting the needs of diverse learners, supporting teachers, and providing school and district leaders with flexible models to support learning. It is important that we remain focused on addressing the digital divide for students in order to build our education system back better than it was before the pandemic. Reliable home internet access is also critical for helping our students’ families recover—including providing access to online workforce development resources, job skills training, and telehealth services.

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The Pursuit of Education: A Story of Homelessness, Perseverance, and the Impact of Caring Educators

The pursuit of education: a story of homelessness, perseverance, and the impact of caring educators

By: Jahnee S.

I was 8 years old when I first experienced homelessness. Homelessness then became a struggle that my family and I couldn’t escape. I experienced standing in the snow, hoping my family and I had a place to sleep on a church floor; how packed and unsanitary emergency shelters are, as I got lice within two days of staying there; how “The Florida Project” brought me flashbacks to the many months my family lived in motels, and how I viewed peers with “the basic necessities” with such envy. Constantly moving and being disappointed led me to become extremely detached and avoid relationships of any kind out of fear of abandonment. Eight years later, at 16 years old, I was still experiencing homelessness. Though homelessness was not new to me, this experience as a 16-year-old was the most difficult because I was on my own without a family.

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Celebrating Heroic Women Breaking Glass and Winning Gold

celebrating heroic women breaking glass and winning gold

Women have made history, shattered glass ceilings, and forged paths in an array of fields spanning from STEM and space exploration to the arts and sports. Through their achievements women have fought for and advanced equality. Some of these remarkable women and their achievements are featured in a new special exhibit housed in the White House. In partnership with the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History (NMAH), the U.S. Department of Education, and the Office of the First Lady, the White House is honoring and celebrating the achievements of women during and beyond Women’s History Month. Celebrate their legacies and lasting impact with us.

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